In so many ways MyDiet determines MyLife; the word diet comes from
the original Greek word diaita, meaning "way of life."
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Diet My Life: Current Article

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#54 Points to Ponder
By Terry Tasche, R.N., B.S.N. 
Master of Photography and Photographic Craftsman
Creator & Author of MyDietMyLife.com
Copyright © Terry Tasche - All Rights Reserved

Geese walking and finding food

"Follow Me" © Terry Tasche


“For lack of knowledge the people perish.” King David

Keep from perishing by pondering these two words that start with the letter P: Protein and Plants.

A good and healthy diet can be boiled down into two main categories, and they both begin with the letter p: Protein and Plants. Put these two healthy p’s on your plates and you will have the healthy products you need. Incorporating this catchy combo into your daily diet will help keep your bodies strong and running smoothly.  

There are a plethora of protein products and plenty of healthy plants to help keep you healthy for a lifetime. Proteins are the building blocks of life and include choices like yogurt, chicken, turkey, beef, pork, fish, eggs, and dairy. Plants contain complex carbohydrates, and provide healthy calories, vitamins, minerals, anti-oxidants, and fiber. Plants come in all tastes and textures and are pleasing to the palate and are arrayed in every color of the rainbow. There are even proteins in some plants. These two P-pals are plentiful and provide powerful energy.

Some problem p’s we need to steer clear of are processed foods and pre-packaged portions that many of us love so much. We’ll live longer and healthier lives without them. Let’s face it, man’s processed products are just not as healthy as the natural proteins and plants. We won’t die if we give up junk food, but may die sooner if we don’t.

Here are a few fun facts of some plants that contain protein, and also happen to start with a p: pine nuts, peanuts, pumpkin seeds, and peas.

•Pine nuts contain 31% protein by weight. That is the highest protein content of any of the nuts. Pine nuts are also a good source of dietary fiber.

•Peanuts are high in protein and grow in pods. The People’s Republic of China leads in production of peanuts. According to a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, eating more nuts is associated with improved blood cholesterol levels. Other protein-rich nuts that start with p are pistachios and pecans.

•Pumpkin seeds are an excellent source of amino acid tryptophan, which is converted into serotonin. Serotonin is often labeled “nature's sleeping pill.” Hulled and roasted-pumpkin seeds are referred to as pepitas. Two p’s they contain are protein and potassium. These hulled seeds can lull us to sleep, meaning they can soothe and calm naturally.

•Peas also contain a high proportion of protein, and they are very popular with kids. They’re part of the pulse family, meaning they come from plants with pods. Mind your p’s and q’s and eat some quinoa, too, a healthy grain packed with protein, a high-protein alternative to rice or pasta, which have no protein to speak of.

There are many other plants, like pecans and pistachios, that start with a p, also parsnips, persimmons, pomegranate, potatoes, popcorn, and Portabella mushrooms to name a few.

Antioxidants in food, such as fruit, vegetables, and whole grains, can come to the rescue and remove the free radicals that damage cells. Consumer Reports states, “The body produces free radicals during exercise and when converting food into energy. Other factors that trigger the production of free radicals are cigarette smoke, alcohol consumption, exposure to sunlight, and environmental contaminants like pesticides. Free radicals can potentially overwhelm the body’s natural defenses. In time, that process is thought to play a role in chronic conditions including cancer, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and eye diseases such as cataracts and age-related macular degeneration. Antioxidants also have other beneficial effects, including combatting inflammation.”

So, ponder these points and protect your health by including protein and plants in meals and snacks, and remember to keep the focus on all the great P’s of health!

Copyright © Terry Tasche - All Rights Reserved 

Description: Macintosh HD:Users:terrytasche:Documents:1_MyDiet_Folders:EditedArticles_CT:#54PabstMansion_4x6_100res.jpg

P.S. I searched my image inventory to find a photo subject that starts with the letter P. Since Dr. Oz reported that beer is a healthy beverage, here’s one I found of Milwaukee’s historic Pabst Mansion.

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#52 Learn It, then Live It

#52 Learn It, then Live It
By Terry Tasche, R.N., B.S.N. 
M.Photog. Cr., F-PPANI, R.N., B.S.N.
Creator & Author of www.MyDietMyLife.com
Copyright © Terry Tasche - All Rights Reserved

Let's take off for a "good flight" as we enjoy the benefits of a healthy diet and a healthy life!

Geese Take Off

Copyright © Terry Tasche

Our health can be improved and even restored when . . .

When what?

When we do what?

When we learn what?

Well, this is how it works:
First of all, we need to learn health-promoting strategies, because the knowledge of healthy habits can help motivate us to want to change our old unhealthy ways. Information can lead to transformation.

And, second, we need to follow through on what we learn. Changing our eating and exercise habits and patterns, can actually change our lives.
We ask, "When will it change us? How long will it take?" It all depends on our commitment to our health. "Will we want to change? Will we be able to change?" Yes, of course!

The learning involves two things: reading and then remembering what we read. When we learn what to do, change what we’re doing, what we begin doing can change our lives. Here are three things that changed for me when I started learning and began doing: my cholesterol, weight, and blood pressure returned to normal.

What made them all change? They changed, because I started doing things differently, like my diet and exercise. I started paying attention to what I was eating, noticing how much I was sitting, and applying what I was learning. Here’s how the exercise part of the equation can help with the remembering part.

The Harvard Health journal states, “Regular exercise reduces the risk of mental decline.” It reported that, according to a study in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association, “Physically active older adults are less likely to decline mentally, even if they already have brain changes that could put them at higher risk.” And it continues, “Over three years, people in the group who exercised for at least 30 minutes on three days per week were less likely than sedentary people to develop mental impairment of any kind.” How does regular exercise help brain health? The study concludes, “Leading theories include healthier arteries, increased blood to the brain, and the mental and social stimulation of group fitness activities.”

What does it take to change? It takes the desire to change, the determination and motivation to change. It may take a wake-up call to jolt us out of our delusion and denial of how our eating, drinking, smoking, or sedentary patterns have changed our good health into bad. That may be just what the doctor ordered.

How does learning change us?

For me, it changed how I looked at junk food vs healthy food. Although asparagus may not look as good as or as tempting as rich combinations of sugar, salt and fat, or a cookie, cake, or other carbs, asparagus, baby spinach, oranges, tomatoes, and even water all look more beautiful to our bodies and bodily systems.

What could be, regarding a healthy body, will never be unless we start making healthy choices. Step away from our jfa (junk food addiction), and run towards health!

Here's the wrap-up: How do we learn? What have we learned? Why do we need to learn? When will we ever learn! Simply put, “We learn what we see, and we don’t learn what we don’t see.”
We learn by seeing, reading and hearing and then hopefully retain what we learn.
But most of all, we retain by doing. The doing will help us retain what we’ve learned.

It’s that simple. By learning and putting the information into our heads, we will, hopefully, then want to apply it and do it. Applying the principles we’ve learned is what it takes to turn it into useful information that can change our lives.

It’s worth taking the time to learn some healthy habits. So, here’s to learning healthy habits and happy living! I’ll drink to that . . . a glass of milk perhaps.

Copyright © Terry Tasche - All Rights Reserved

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Going South for the Winter Geese flying

“Going South for the Winter” by © Terry Tasche

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#50 Make No Bones About It!


by Terry Tasche, R.N., B.S.N.
founder of mydietmylife.com 
Master of Photography and Photographic Craftsman 
Copyright © Terry Tasche - All Rights Reserved 

“Make no bones about it,” means that someone is telling the truth and speaking plainly. These are the bare-bone facts about bones that we need to know, learn, and apply, or else our bodies will  “Make No Bones.” That is exactly what will happen if we don’t know how to take care of our precious bones.

“Dem bones, dem bones, dem dry bones!” as the song lyrics go, may be dry and brittle and ready to snap! What do our bones do for us? Bones make up the skeletal system and allow us to be upright rather than flat on the floor, or in bed. If we follow bone-health guidelines, our bodies can make and maintain the bones we need in order to stand up straight. Use ‘em or lose ‘em. So, let’s stand up for bone health!

The constant renewal of bone is crucial to healthy bone architecture. Also, bone health is connected to blood health, and the body’s efficiency is absolutely awesome. The red-blood-cell-production factory is found in the heads of long bones, in a process known as hematopoiesis, which is the formation of blood cellular components. According to Wikipedia, “The hematopoietic compartment of bone marrow produces approximately 500 billion blood cells per day, which use the bone marrow vasculature as a conduit to the body's systemic circulation. Bone marrow is also a key component of the lymphatic system, producing the lymphocytes that support the body's immune system. Red blood cells, platelets and most white blood cells arise in red bone marrow.”  Isn’t that fascinating!

How can I destroy my bones? Oh, let me count the ways, because there are many ways to cause their deterioration! How can I keep mine flexible, strong and dense?

Here are seven significant things regarding bone health. And, contrary to popular opinion, “What you don’t know won’t hurt you,” the things I don’t know can hurt me:

  1. The RDA (Recommended Daily Allowance) of calcium ranges from 1,000 mg to 1,500 mg depending on age and sex. The supplement calcium carbonate depends on stomach acids to be absorbed, so it is necessary to take calcium carbonate with food. 
  2. Calcium-supplement doses need to be spread throughout the day, because research has found that only about 500 mg can be absorbed at a time, and high-dose surges of calcium in the bloodstream may raise heart attack risk. (I take calcium with water and whole wheat crackers or fruit and no longer take it with yogurt, cheese, milk or O.J., because the total calcium intake would add up to more than 500 mg.)
  3. Getting adequate doses of vitamins C, D3 and K2 are necessary for calcium absorption. They will help the body direct the ingested calcium to the bones where it belongs, and not in the heart and blood vessels where it doesn’t. Studies have shown that elderly patients who fractured bones had significantly lower levels of vitamin C in their blood than those who haven't fractured. (I now take my calcium supplements along with a vitamin C pill.)
  4. Vitamin D3 RDA is 800 IU (International Units) for a fracture-prevention benefit.
  5. Sitting at the computer, or any sitting, for hours on end is bad for the bones. Therefore, not engaging in exercise, e.g. walking, is bad for bone health.
  6. Exercises (weight-bearing and strength-training) are main ingredients in maintaining bone health.
  7. Eating and drinking things that are considered acidic, i.e., processed foods, sugar, salt, colas, and caffeine (lattes may be helpful), can be bad for bone health. The body needs to neutralize the acidic state, which it does by leaching calcium from the bones. An interesting finding is that, in general, disease thrives in an acidic (low pH) environment and starves in an alkaline (high pH) environment.

The director of Tufts’ HNRCA Bone Metabolism Laboratory Bess Dawson-Hughes states, “If you’re low on calcium intake, your body borrows what it needs from your bones. As the body gets older, the breakdown of the bones accelerates.”  

Milk and other dairy products such as yogurt and cheese are rich natural sources of calcium. An eight-ounce glass of milk, a 1.5-ounce serving of cheese, or a cup of low-fat yogurt, supplies almost 300 milligrams of calcium. Some other sources of calcium are almonds, coconut, calcium-fortified breakfast cereals, orange juice, and beans and greens. It’s important to check vitamin and calcium content on food labels, too!

So, make no bones about it. Instead of making no bones, let’s make our bones strong and healthy by knowing what to do, and what NOT to do! Our bodies can make the bones we need so that we can stand up, sit down, and move around ~ for a lifetime!

Reflections in Bond Falls Upper Peninsula of Michigan

“Fall Reflections in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan” © Terry Tasche

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#49 The Devil-Made-Me-Do-It Diet

Terry Tasche
M.Photog. Cr., F-PPANI, R.N., B.S.N.
Founder of mydietmylife.com 

Copyright © Terry Tasche - All Rights Reserved

What’s wrong with this diet? It’s not what the body needs, but more likely what the taste buds want. What the body doesn’t need is a diet that results in diabetes. What the taste buds want and what the brain may think it needs can split my head in two directions. What’s a person to do?

I know the problem of obesity is growing to epidemic proportions. What’s the cause? I might say, “Well, everybody overeats and consumes too many calories. Everybody’s doing it. Everybody gains weight as they get older. I just can’t help myself. It’s a hopeless situation, so I might as well give up and throw in the towel.”

The-Devil-Made-Me-Do-It Diet is a Diabolical Diet (DD). Why? Because it’s a way of eating that can lead to disease and even a diagnosis of diabetes. It’s diabolical and evil, because it is bent on destruction; it’s a killer.  The DD’s slogan could be comedian Flip Wilson’s famous quote, “The Devil Made Me Do It,” which he said often on his weekly sitcom.  I tried, but often failed, to stay away from this dangerous diet, but finally would succumb, because, all together now, “The Devil Made Me Do It!” 

Of course, not everyone who eats the Diabolical Diet will get Diabetes. The reports say that the risk increases as the obesity quotient of Americans goes up, meaning that many overeaters are walking a tight rope regarding their health. But, since not all obese people develop diabetes, I was curious to know what percentage do. The term metabolically healthy obese (MHO) came up in my search, and it turns out that, as the website chriskresser.com reports, only 6% of the MHO do not develop diabetes.

Maybe you’ve been told that you are “pre-diabetic,” which means that the body isn’t handling sugar like it should be. How can you escape such a fate of going full speed ahead to being diagnosed as a full-blown diabetic? No one wants that, because it could mean living on daily doses of insulin and measuring blood-sugar levels several times a day, not to mention possible amputation of limbs, kidney failure, heart disease and even premature death.

I know a friend who is overweight and has diabetes. He now has kidney failure so carries around a portable kidney dialysis machine, his constant companion even on vacation. There is no vacation from his pal. He told me that his first symptom of renal failure was nausea.

Another friend of mine, who also has diabetes, told me that she would often go to bed with a Snickers candy bar on her chest, waking throughout the night to take another bite. She eventually noticed blurriness of vision.

“Increase in calorie consumption is the major cause of the obesity epidemic,” says Thomas A. Farley, MD, MPH, as reported in September 19, 2012, issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). Dr. Farley stated that caloric intake in America has increased some 200-600 more calories per person per day since the 1970’s. He also made a good point, “High-profit products are marketed, not just with billions of dollars in advertising, but also with convenient packaging, promotional pricing, and placement that facilitates impulse purchases.”

I was especially vulnerable to that last one and would often pick up some “treat” at the check-out counter. But in the end, I have to appreciate that it is no treat to have diabetes or to be on kidney dialysis. Distractions do me in, making it hard to win.

Here’s an antidote for the Diabolical Diet:
The Diabetic Prevention Diet (DPD), which takes Dedication, Determination, and Decisiveness
1. Dedication to a healthy diet.
2. Determination to eat healthy food (listed in previous articles) and exercise daily.
3. Decisiveness to use the knowledge gained to make wise choices.

Although my taste buds crave sugar, salt and fat, my body needs more than that! Retrain the taste buds to yearn for healthy helpings like fruits and vegetables (F&V’s). Thinking through the benefits of a healthy diet and the destructiveness of the diabolical diet will help me stave off a diagnosis of diabetes.

Here’s a collage I made from a photo taken by your friend and mine, Karen Rodgers, at our daughter’s August wedding in Vail. The iPhone app put me in a magazine, Times Square, a museum, and even created a Warhol effect. Incidentally, Jeff Johnson, son of Tom Johnson of Rockford, was our photographer. And, Jeff is coming soon to Illinois to do a program for us, too!

Copyright © Terry Tasche - All Rights Reserved

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#48 Seven Signals that Signify Health
by Terry Tasche, R.N., B.S.N., M.Photog. Cr., F-PPANI
Creator and Author of mydietmylife.com

fisherman fishing after the rain

"After the Rain" © Terry Tasche

I love this quote by John Luhmann, “Everyday you are becoming who you will be forever.”

 Everyday I am building, or destroying, the body I would like to have by the choices I make. Am I eating healthy greens, fruits and vegetables, lean protein, low-fat dairy, legumes, whole grains, fish, olive oil? Or, am I eating junk food devoid of healthy nutrients?

My bodily construction and structure depends on the building blocks it’s given.
When I give it starch, sugar, fat and salt, it’s not strengthened, but weakened. We wouldn’t think of feeding our pets a steady diet of cupcakes, cookies, and candy, or fat and salt, alcohol, or colas, but think nothing of these unhealthy choices for ourselves. What is wrong with this picture? Every bite I take is an active choice, and I am the only participant. If we saw our pet smoking, what would we think?

Take note of these Seven Signals that Signify Health:

  1. Exercise
  2. Not smoking
  3. Healthy eating
  4. Normal weight
  5. Normal cholesterol
  6. Normal blood pressure
  7. Normal blood glucose level

According to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), those who met these seven standards for health had a significantly lower risk of death. Tufts Health & Nutrition Letter states,“Those who met at least six of the heart-health lifestyle factors were 76% less likely to die of cardiovascular causes.” Now that’s a stat I can take to the bank and the gym!

Are we all on board here?
1) Smokers, are you willing to give up the tar, nicotine, and CO for the sake of your heart’s health?

2) Unhealthy Eaters, is there a willingness to read and learn in order to change? John Adams once said, “I must judge for myself, but how can I judge, how can any man judge, unless his mind has been opened and enlarged by reading?”

3) Unwilling Walkers, get up and start walking today.

There is hope; we can change if we have the willingness. There is plenty of help out there to give us all hope for a healthy future. One suggestion is to be a smart-snacker and stop sneaking unhealthy snacks, which was my favorite out-of-control thing to do.

The healthy heart, although not visible, is in there pumping away every day of our lives. Let’s live longer by keeping it healthy!

Copyright © Terry Tasche - All Rights Reserved

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jjjj

It's fun to "paint" using Corel Painter, and then print the final art piece on canvas.

Corel Painter Portrait

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Copyright © Terry Tasche - All Rights Reserved

© 2012 Terry Tasche, Chicago, IL 60614. All rights reserved. Nothing may be used without prior permission from Terry Tasche. This website contains the opinions and ideas of its authors. It is intended for motivational use only. You should contact your medical or healthcare professional before adopting any of the suggestions listed. Site design & development by pterry studios

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© 2012 Terry Tasche, Chicago, IL 60614. All rights reserved. Nothing may be used without prior permission from Terry Tasche. This website contains the opinions and ideas of its authors. It is intended for motivational use only. You should contact your medical or healthcare professional before adopting any of the suggestions listed. Site design & development by pterry studios

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© 2012 Terry Tasche, Chicago, IL 60614. All rights reserved. Nothing may be used without prior permission from Terry Tasche. This website contains the opinions and ideas of its authors. It is intended for motivational use only. You should contact your medical or healthcare professional before adopting any of the suggestions listed. Site design & development by pterry studios

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